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Tips on Writing a Persuasive Essay

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Overview Objectives To introduce the purpose of opinion writing. To identify and explore the organizational structure of an opinion piece.

To identify and explore the language features of an opinion piece. To identify and explore persuasive devices. To identify and use correct paragraph structure. To improve an opinion piece by applying knowledge of appropriate language features and devices. To write an opinion letter using appropriate text structure, language features and devices. To learn and apply proofreading and editing skills.

To research evidence to include in an opinion speech about a topical issue. To construct an opinion speech using appropriate text structure, language features and devices. To present an opinion speech to the class using appropriate oral presentation skills. Preparing for Learning Persuasive writing provides excellent opportunities for cross-curricular integration. Access on the Ultimate Plan A 60 minute lesson designed to introduce the purpose of opinion writing.

Lesson 2 60 minutes Opinion Pieces - Organizational Structure Access on the Ultimate Plan A 60 minute lesson in which students will identify and explore the organizational structure of an opinion piece. Lesson 3 60 minutes Opinion Pieces - Language Features Access on the Ultimate Plan A 60 minute lesson in which students will identify and explore the language features of an opinion piece. Lesson 4 60 minutes Using Persuasive Devices Access on the Ultimate Plan A 60 minute lesson in which students will identify and explore persuasive devices.

Lesson 5 60 minutes Constructing an Opinion Paragraph Access on the Ultimate Plan A 60 minute lesson in which students will identify and use correct paragraph structure.

Lesson 6 60 minutes Modeled Writing - Improving an Opinion Piece Access on the Ultimate Plan A 60 minute lesson in which students will improve an opinion piece by applying knowledge of appropriate language features and devices.

Lesson 7 60 minutes Shared Writing - Opinion Letters Access on the Ultimate Plan A 60 minute lesson in which students will write an opinion letter using appropriate text structure, language features and devices. Lesson 8 60 minutes Applying Proofreading and Editing Skills Access on the Ultimate Plan A 60 minute lesson in which students will learn and apply proofreading and editing skills. Lesson 9 60 minutes Opinion Speech - Researching Access on the Ultimate Plan A 60 minute lesson in which students will research evidence to include in an opinion speech about a topical issue.

Lesson 10 60 minutes Opinion Speeches - Constructing Access on the Ultimate Plan A 60 minute lesson in which students will construct an opinion speech using appropriate text structure, language features and devices. Based on the class discussion, list examples of what students' qualify each as a picture, symbol, or slogan and write various examples in each column.

Ask students to quickly brainstorm what comes to mind when they see the symbols or read the catchwords and catchphrases in column 1. Write students' responses in the second column. Have students write their personal reactions to the symbols, catchwords, and catchphrases in column 2 of their own worksheets. As a class, discuss what "transfer" means in persuasive writing: Divide the class into four or five small groups.

Each group will study part of the classroom collection of magazine advertisements from Day 1. Explain that students will need to examine the advertisements to determine their purpose, how they achieve that purpose, and what they are selling. Let students know that they can complete the worksheet as a group, but that all students should have their own copy of the group's answers.

Have students find at least one advertisement that evokes each of the feelings and emotions in column 1. For each advertisement example, the group should record the picture or catchphrase that appeals to the emotion in column 2. In column 3, the group should record the product or service that the advertiser is selling. Have each group present their entries to the whole class and discuss what is persuasive about each advertisement. Ask students to work independently or with a partner to write and design an advertisement.

Conduct a class discussion by studying each ad and determining how well the advertiser followed the guidelines. Students can create a commercial for their advertised product. They can work individually or in groups and write a script for the commercial. Then break students into small groups to act out each other's commercials or skits for the class.

Here are some resource books I use to guide my curriculum design. From different ways to publish students' writing to understanding literary elements, these resources will be sure to give you new and creative ideas to spark students' interests. Have students find an advertisement in a magazine or newspaper that: Students can write a reflection about what they found. Many consider anger, fear, and empathy to be strong factors in influencing audiences, making this method of argumentation a worthy one.

After you understand these three methods, it is also important to understand basic devices you can use to emphasize any argument. Some powerful literary devices are metaphor, simile, repetition, and parallelism. Get access risk-free for 30 days, just create an account.

A metaphor is a direct comparison made between two different objects, ideas, or places without using such linking words as 'like' or 'as. A phrase that uses 'like' or 'as' to make a comparison is called a simile. This is used to make a comparison more visual. Repetition is the conscious repeating of a word or phrase in order to build up and strengthen the point you are making.

Parallelism in writing is very similar to repetition, but it is more about the sound and rhythm of the sentence construction. Repeating sentence patterns create a flow that the audience will find appealing and will therefore make them more engaged.

Persuasive writing is presenting ideas in the best way to guide the audience to the desired conclusion--to influence the audience. Ethos, logos, and pathos are three areas of persuasive writing that involve using your own character, logic, and emotion, respectively. Literary devices are also useful for emphasizing arguments.

A few examples of these devices are metaphor, simile, repetition, and parallelism. Knowing how and when to use these tools is a critical part of connecting with readers and influencing them. To unlock this lesson you must be a Study. Did you know… We have over college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1, colleges and universities.

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By creating an account, you agree to Study. Explore over 4, video courses. Find a degree that fits your goals. Persuasive Devices in Writing: This lesson will break down its basic components and help you to excel in the art of persuasion.

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You must create an account to continue watching. Register to view this lesson Are you a student or a teacher? I am a student I am a teacher. What teachers are saying about Study. Are you still watching? Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds. Add to Add to Add to. Want to watch this again later? Types of Persuasion Techniques: How to Influence People. What is Persuasive Text? Components of Writing a Persuasive Essay.

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Structure of writing Sentence length Paragraphing Topic sentences Use of speech Look at a range of texts to see examples of all these features For the purpose of persuasive writing, unless you are delivering a speech or extended piece of writing, the sentences and paragraphs should be kept relatively short and to the point.

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Persuasive writing using literary devices to convince/persuade in a written piece Objectives: • Learn to identify common literary devices used to persuade readers; • Understand the effect of these literary devices on readers; • Develop the ability to use literary devices in persuasive writing. Grade 9 SAUSD Writing Notebook Persuasive Writing Benchmark / Strategic. Persuasive Techniques in Advertising, may be provided for good grades and that they will now be writing a persuasive essay about whether students should earn money for good grades. Explain that a persuasive essay is a type of.

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Propaganda and Persuasive Techniques zPropagandists use a variety of propaganda (persuasive) techniquesto influence opinions and to avoid the truth. zOften these techniques rely on some element of censorship or manipulation, either omitting significant information or distorting it. russianescortsinuae.tk Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. russianescortsinuae.tk Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a .